Tag Archives: Foodgrains

June 2016 – Celebrating 20 years of Publishing!

may 2016

Managing Editor: Dan Guetre

News Writers: Marianne Curtis and Dan Guetre

Columnists: Lee Guetre, Peter Friesen, Anni Markmann, Peter Martins

Production and design: Dan Guetre, Myriam Dyck, and Monica Guetre

Advertising: Karen Jorgenson and Dan Guetre

CONTACT

Dan Guetre: Editor, publisher, owner

editor@dawsontrail.ca

***

Marianne Curtis: journalist 

mariannecurtis@dawsontrail.ca

***

Karen Jorgenson, Sales 

sales@dawsontrail.ca

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Grow project harvested in St. Pierre

As of September 18 theCanadian Foodgrains Bank HELP harvest located south of St. Pierre was done for 2012.

The last field which was 55 acres of soybeans yielded 37 bushel per acre and will be sold for about $15 per bushel.

“This was a very good price and good yield,” stated Harold Penner, Manitoba Resource coordinator with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

This made the community’s contribution an estimated $30,525 which is matched by the federal government at a rate of 4:1 for a total of $122,100.

Canadian Foodgrains Bank is a partnership of Canadian church-based agencies working to end hunger in developing countries by increasing and deepening the involvement of Canadians, in an effort to end hunger.

Through the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CFGB) a number of grain producers in the region donate portions of their crops, or planted specifically to support the program.

Nationally the CFGB has delivered $514,717,753 worth of programming and shipped 1,005,725 metric tonnes of food and seeds to 76 countries around the world.

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Foodgrains harvests roll in

Photo by Marianne Curtis

This field of soybeans south of St. Pierre is the last of four grow projects within the region waiting to be harvested in support of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

By Marianne Curtis

Canadian Foodgrains projects in Landmark and St. Malo recently saw record harvests despite the unusually dry summer.

On August 10, the Landmark Foodgrains Project harvested 4,676 bushels of wheat for the Canadian Food Grains Bank. This made the community’s contribution an estimated $40,200 which is matched by the federal government at a rate of 4:1. As a result, Landmark grow project raised a total of $201,000 in food aid or enough food to feed a village of 300 for a year.

During the same week In St. Malo the Canadian Foodgrains Bank project called HOPE was also harvested. This project is made up of four fields located in the St. Malo area and extends just east of Morris. Volunteers finished harvesting the hard red spring wheat crop.

“We harvested about 15,000 bushels of top quality of wheat which was hauled to the elevator,” said spokesman Art Enns. “We had good participation, lots of people showed up, the weather was good, and it didn’t take long and we had it done.”

To date, three out of the regions four food grains project has been harvested. Last month the Niverville and District grow project harvested a record amount of winter wheat. The crop produced about $150,000 for the Foodgrains Bank—their biggest donation since starting in 2000. The HELP project south of St. Pierre is still waiting to be harvested.

Canadian Foodgrains Bank is a partnership of Canadian church-based agencies working to end hunger in developing countries by increasing and deepening the involvement of Canadians, in an effort to end hunger.

Through the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CFGB) a number of grain producers in the region donate portions of their crops, or planted specifically to support the program.

Nationally the CFGB has delivered $514,717,753 worth of programming and shipped 1,005,725 metric tonnes of food and seeds to 76 countries around the world.

 

 

 

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Selling jelly to end hunger

By Marianne Curtis

Family members of the founding father of the Canadian Food Grains Bank are continuing his legacy. His grandson now heads the Landmark Branch grow project and now his daughter in law is running a “jam drive”.

Deb Loewen is the wife of Rick Loewen who’s father C.Wilbert Loewen founded the Canadian Food Grains Bank. She explained that her son Matt Plett heads up the Landmark branch of the growing project, an undertaking he “inherited” from his grandfather.

“This organization is near and dear to our hearts for a number of reasons; first and foremost my husband’s dad founded it – not content with that he went on to implore the federal government to match all donations,” Loewen explained. “There is also a story behind the apples used in this Country Apple Jam – they are harvested from the Loewen Heritage Home in Steinbach where Rick’s dad grew up.”

Loewen explained that the apple jelly is perfect for toast but is thin enough to be used for ice cream, and other toppings.

“For each $20 in money raised selling jelly, that is $100 for the Canadian Food Grains Bank,” Loewen continued. “It’s a win – win.”

There is a minimum donation for pints of $10.00 and for half pints, $5.00 Donations over $20; payable to Prairie Rose EMC and marked for Landmark Food Grains Bank are tax deductible. Anyone interested in ordering their jams contact Deb Loewen at 204-355-4567.

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Record Foodgrains Harvest in Niverville

Fifteen combines came out to help the Niverville and District grow project harvest 264 acres of winter wheat for Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

By Marianne Curtis

Harvesting season has begun and the Niverville and District Canadian Foodgrains growing project recently broke its donation record after harvesting winter wheat.

On July 24, the project harvested 78.2 bushels an acre from its 264 acres of winter wheat. Sold for $7.25 a bushel to area farmers for animal feed, the crop produced about $150,000 for the Foodgrains Bank—their biggest donation since starting in 2000.

Ken Krahn, with the Niverville and District grow project was pleased with the groups contribution.

“Everything that came off was donated one hundred percent to Canadian Foodgrains,” Krahn stated. “I believe our last record was $100,000 so this was definitely a jump from that.”

On harvest day 15 combines and six grain cards participated in the afternoon harvest.

“It was a kind of party atmosphere with picnic tables and a bbq,” Krahn noted.

Canadian Foodgrains Bank is a partnership of Canadian church-based agencies working to end hunger in developing countries by increasing and deepening the involvement of Canadians, in an effort to end hunger.

Through the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CFGB) a number of grain producers in the region donate portions of their crops, or planted specifically to support the program.

Nationally the CFGB has delivered $514,717,753 worth of programming and shipped 1,005,725 metric tonnes of food and seeds to 76 countries around the world.

 

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Foodgrain harvests feed the hungry

Near Landmark, farmers brought out their antique machinery and tracters to harvest their Foodgrain’s crop.

By Marianne Curtis

   It may have been a rough year for the agricultural community but their commitment to feeding the hungry in other counties continues. Throughout the region, crop reports have been coming in on the successes of the Canadian Foodgrains grow projects.

   Through the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CFGB) a number of grain producers in the region have donated portions of their crops or planted specifically to support the program.

   According to Harold Penner, CFGB Manitoba Resource Coordinator, there are a few projects scattered through the region in the communities of Landmark, St. Pierre and Niverville.

   “It’s great to see people traveling between communities and supporting each other,” stated Penner. “Together we make a huge difference in this world.”

   In mid August harvesting began in St. Pierre with four fields of oats being harvested, said Ron Tone, who was involved with the HELP project.

   “I got into this because I wanted to help,” explained Tone.  “I was in Africa for three years so I know what they go through with the drought and no food, so I am proud to help out.”

   On August 21 local farmers in Landmark harvested 93 acres of wheat. At the time of this publication, Niverville just harvested 200 acres of canola, but final numbers were not available.

   In Manitoba over 4,200 acres are used to produce crops that will provide food for people in need through the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. The organization is a partnership of Canadian church-based agencies working to end hunger in developing countries by increasing and deepening the involvement of Canadians in an effort to end hunger.

   Nationally the CFGB has delivered $514,717,753 worth of programming and shipped 1,005,725 metric tonnes of food and seeds to 76 countries around the world.

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